Supernatural: TVGuide.com Readers’ Questions Answered!

“Que sera, Sera?” Supernatural supervising producer Sera Gamble invited the show’s fans here at TVGuide.com to submit their burning questions. Can Dean’s self-worth be salvaged? To what is Sam about to have a strong reaction? Can Ruby truly be trusted? Why are the angels a bit devilish? Will Lilith return? Read on for insight on the CW’s outta sight spooktacular series. Is this season is leading up to a fierce showdown between Dean and Sam? Sera Gamble: You do know that [series creator] Eric [Kripke] would kill me if I told you what all this is leading up to, right? Dean’s cool with Ruby now? No lingering suspicion? She kept Sam from killing himself and that clears her? Gamble: I doubt Dean will ever be fully cool with Ruby. His deepest hunter instinct is to be suspicious of her. But he’s unable to just see her in black-and-white anymore. She did too much for his brother. I think Dean is capable of being grateful to Ruby for keeping Sam alive while he was in Hell … and still remains unsettled by her, to a certain extent. Are Castiel and Uriel for sure sent by the Big Guy, or could they have their own agenda? Could they be Fallen Angels themselves? Uriel at least seemed not very Angelic when he withheld Anna’s Grace. Gamble: Our angels aren’t “angelic” in the porcelain doll sense. They’re warriors, and they behave like it. It can be pretty jarring; it certainly was to Sam and Dean. As for whether or not they were “for sure” sent by God … it seems to me that on our show, there’s been a good rule of thumb so far: Evil is a certainty. But good is not as easy to pin down. It requires a certain amount of faith. Dean is suffering blow after crushing blow to...

An Interview With Sera Gamble, Supernatural Producer and Writer, Part Two

Part two of my interview with Sera Gamble is quite different from the first. I get her response to Jared Padalecki cringing at her scripts, she lets us know just how dedicated Eric Kripke is to the show, and she answers a variety of fan questions about not only the show but her former writing partner, Raelle Tucker, Frenchies, and her latest projects. Just as in part one, she reveals some interesting information. On a personal note, I was able to confirm from Jared Padalecki at the “Salute to Supernatural” convention in Chicago that he does indeed cringe when he sees your name on a script. In his words, he’s either “naked, crying, or naked and crying.” Do you take some twisted pride in that? Sera Gamble: Jared is hilarious. The thing I actually do take pride in is writing to our actors’ strengths. The reason I can write Jared and Jensen such emotionally demanding scenes is that I know they’ll nail them. They’re victims of their talent. And before people make the joke, I am so not talking about the naked thing. Come on. In all seriousness, our show isn’t even in the running when it comes to the implied nudity competition on network television. We’re positively restrained. All right, now that I’ve said that you’re all free to go ahead and make the joke. Is approval of what goes into the mythology happening by panel, or from Eric Kripke himself? Sera Gamble: Mythology arcs are mostly hashed out in brainstorming sessions, headed up by Eric. As for approval – creatively, the buck stops with Eric. Thus has it ever been. Eric Kripke. Madman or evil genius? Sera Gamble: Both of these seem kind of negative to me. I wouldn’t say he’s entirely mad… or completely evil. He is, however, utterly dedicated to his work. Did you see...

Interview: Sera Gamble, Producer and Writer for “Supernatural”

“It’s just one of those out-of-our-control things that happened.” The last of Supernatural’s pre-strike episodes, “Jus In Bello,” has aired. Intense and heavily myth-arc based, the episode leaves fans with a long wait until April 24, when the last four episodes of season three start to air. Sera Gamble, producer and writer for the show, agreed to talk to Firefox News via email about what it’s like to get back to work, why the staff is laughing, matching tattoos, savvy fans, and how rough things could get for Sam and Dean Winchester. (Spoiler warning for upcoming episodes). FFN: How did being on strike affect you as a writer? Were you able to work on any independent projects? SG: Well, the main effect, of course, was that I had to stop working. And I was involved in a couple of projects that lost momentum — one might be salvageable, but I’m pretty sure the strike killed the other one. I’m philosophical about that — I expected it to happen. Almost every writer I know took a hit for the strike. And plenty were fired or had their shows canceled, so all in all I was very lucky. I had a job to go back to. And yes, I did try to use my strike time wisely. I saw the fact that I was barred from writing anything for the studios as an opportunity to work on stuff that I could never pitch as a slick, easily-understandable commercial package. I picked my favorite weird idea and immersed myself for a few weeks. It worked, too — the run-up to the strike was hugely stressful, and I was burned out and exhausted. Now, I feel back in touch with why I love writing. FFN: What’s it like getting back to work? Are people charged up? Is it a smooth process picking up...

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